Server

Netlify isn't as bad as I thought it would be

When I wrote, that I switched from a Ghost-based blog to a static site generated by Hugo, I made the following statement: I don’t use a service like GitHub pages or Netlify, because using my own server really guarantees me full control. But it would be a good alternative, if you don’t want to manage your own server. Netlify can also cover the automatic deploy process. Since then I switched all my blogs from Ghost to Hugo, but also started using Netlify for the hosting of my static sites.

Hugo Is Awesome - Why I moved from Ghost to Hugo

Hugo is a framework to build static websites. Yesterday I migrated this blog from Ghost - a dynamic NodeJS based CMS - to Hugo, not only to reduce the hardware requirements (a static page uses way less resources), but also to simplify my setup. I already use Hugo for two basic homepages (my personal one and the AndroidPub one), where I don’t have that many requirements regarding “blogging”, because I don’t use them for blogs.

Why I Moved My Server To RancherOS

Containers are wonderful and Docker is a really awesome and lifesaving technology, even if you don’t host sites and services with millions of users that need to auto-scale etc. Docker can already simplify a simple hosting setup just with a couple of small webpages and a Git server. Some months ago I switched my whole setup to use only Docker. I used Ubuntu server because that was the best option at my hosting provider.

Back To Static - And How I Made Forms Working

I used Pagekit for quite some time with my personal homepage. Pagekit gave me a nice Admin UI and there were also nice themes and plugins, which I could use. But Pagekit is PHP and the setup isn’t that optimal. So I switched back to a static site setup with Hugo. Some years ago I used Jekyll to build a lot of websites. Jekyll was really easy to use and you could host your sites on GitHub for free, I didn’t rent a server yet back then.

For the Paranoids: Install Your Own Firefox Sync Server

Many people use Google Chrome, because they like it’s fancy syncing feature. You know, open a tab on your PC and just continue on your phone. Or because of the nice built-in password manager. Just save that damn password and it’s securely stored in your Google account and available everywhere. But what about privacy? You can forget it when you use Chrome. You have no privacy there. Google can read all of your browser history, passwords and bookmarks.